Art Pepper

He began his career in the 1940s, playing with Benny Carter and Stan Kenton (1946-52). By the 1950s Pepper was recognized as one of the leading alto saxophonists in jazz, epitomized by his finishing second only to Charlie Parker as Best Alto Saxophonist in the down beat magazine Readers Poll of 1952. Along with Chet Baker, Gerry Mulligan and Shelly Manne, and perhaps due more to geography than playing style, Pepper is often associated with the musical movement known as West Coast jazz, as contrasted with the East Coast (or "hot") jazz associated with Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie. Pepper was a member of Buddy Rich's Big Band from 1968-69, and in 1977 and 1978 made two well received tours of Japan.

Pepper was born in San Pedro, California. He became a heroin addict in the 1940s, and his career was interrupted by drug-related prison sentences in the 1950s and 1960s. In the late 1960s he spent time in Synanon, a drug rehabilitation group. After beginning methadone therapy in the mid-1970s, Pepper enjoyed a musical comeback and recorded a series of highly acclaimed albums. His autobiography Straight Life (1980), co-written with his third wife Laurie Pepper, is a unique exploration into the jazz world and drug and criminal subcultures of mid-twentieth century California.

Art Pepper

Art Pepper est né en Californie en 1925. C'est un sax alto du cool jazz de la West Coast dans les années 50. Dans les années 40, il devint un junkie à l'héroïne, et sa carrière fut brisée par des peines de prisons dans les années 50 et 60 et par une terrible addiction. Il est mort en 1982, laissant à la postérité des enregistrements de West Coast Jazz et de ballades qui démontrent qu'il fut l'un des plus grands saxophones alto de l'histoire du jazz.